2022 California Policy Priorities

Each year, the Alliance focuses on a slate of policies that advance race and gender justice by transforming systems failing our boys and men of color, their families and communities.

To see our 2022 California policy priorities, click here or expand the boxes below.

Youth Leadership and Justice

AB 503 (STONE) END ENDLESS PROBATION

Limits the time young people spend under probation supervision to six months unless the court determines (after a hearing) that it is in the best interest of the young person to extend probation. Limits probation conditions, requiring that they are individually tailored, developmentally appropriate, and reasonable. Co-Sponsors: ABMoC, National Center for Youth Law, W. Haywood Burns Institute, Young Women’s Freedom Center, Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice, Youth Justice Coalition

$60 MILLION FOR CALIFORNIA YOUTH LEADERSHIP CORPS

[APPROVED] $60 million, over four years, to scale and expand the California Youth Leadership Corps program to 12 community colleges and provide over 1,800 students with the opportunity to gain work and leadership experience in community building. Led by: ABMoC, Community Learning Partnership.

$1.5 MILLION FOR AB 46 IMPLEMENTATION (L. RIVAS)

[APPROVED] $1.5 million annually  to establish and fund the Youth Empowerment Commission, California’s statewide advisory body comprised solely of youth. Led by: ABMoC, California Association of Student Councils, California Coalition for Youth, California Youth Connection, Mi Familia Vota, San Francisco Youth Commission

$65 MILLION FOR CALIFORNIA YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM (CAYAP)

[APPROVED] $65 million, over three years, to establish the Youth Apprenticeship Program, link together existing apprenticeship programs, and support with outreach and engagement of youth across the state.

SB 1273 (BRADFORD) EMPOWER EDUCATORS, PROTECT STUDENTS

AB 937 (CARRILLO) VISION ACT: #StopICETransfers

AB 2022 (RAMOS) BAN USE OF “S-WORD”

Prohibits the use of the “s-word” for  geographic features and place names in California, and create a statewide process to remove offensive names locally in partnership with local tribes and the Native American Heritage Commission.
Co-Sponsors: ABMoC, ACLU California Action, Restoring Justice for Indigenous Peoples, Renaming S-Valley Coalition

AUDIT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENTS AND FUNDING (LEE)

Requests that the Joint Legislative Audit Committee approve an audit of law enforcement expenditures and recommendations for reducing the footprint of law enforcement by employing alternative responses.

AB 2790 (WICKS) CENTERING SURVIVOR SAFETY & HEALTH

[FAILED TO PASS COMMITTEE ] Would eliminate requirements that healthcare providers notify law enforcement of a broad range of injuries related to domestic violence. The bill will mandate that victims of domestic violence get referred to domestic violence supports­ and ensures survivors are provided the agency and information they need to be safe and healthy. Co-Sponsors: ABMoC, Futures Without Violence, UC Irvine Domestic Violence Law Clinic

40.5 MILLION FOR DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES & PROGRAMS

[BUDGET] $40.5 million proposal that will eliminate inequitable fees and creates stable and ongoing funding for organizations that support survivors of domestic and sexual violence, prevention programming, and invest in innovative approaches to ending domestic and sexual violence in California. Led by: ABMoC, California Partnership to End Domestic Violence, ValorUS, Culturally Responsive Domestic Violence Network

CA COMMUNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (CCSPP)

Community-based organizations across the state are working to ensure the $3 billion CCSPP creates racially just, relationship-centered schools —where power and decision-making is shared with students, families, educators, and community—and investments. Led by: ABMoC and California Partnership for the Future of Learning

AB 628 (E.GARCIA) BREAKING BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVE

$25 million secured to renew and expand workforce grant program that empowers community-based organizations to support people who face barriers to employment. Led by: ABMoC, California Immigrant Policy Center, California Workforce Association, CROP Organization

AB 118 (KAMLAGER) CRISES ACT

$10 million secured to fund the CRISES Act and establish pilot grant program, to invest in and promote police-free and community-based responses to local emergencies, including public health crises, mental health crises, intimate partner violence, natural disasters, and community violence. Led by: ABMoC, ACLU-CA, Anti Police-Terror Project, Berkeley Free Clinic, Black Lives Matter Los Angeles, Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice, East Bay Community Law Center, Justice Teams Network, Oakland Power Projects, Public Health Advocates, Silicon Valley De-Bug, Stop Terrorism Oppression by Police Coalition, Youth Justice Coalition

SB 2 (BRADFORD) POLICE DE-CERTIFICATION

Protects Black people and communities of color from abusive police by creating a statewide process to cancel professional certificates for officers who abuse their power. SB 2 also ensures that officers no longer have absolute immunity protections for injuring people who are incarcerated, refusing to provide medical care and planting evidence. Co-Sponsored by the Let Us Live Coalition: Alliance for Boys and Men of Color, ACLU-CA, Anti Police-Terror Project (APTP), Black Lives Matter California, California Families United For Justice, Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ), STOP Coalition, Youth Justice Coalition